Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Black Friday...a blessing or a curse?

Black Friday is just a few short days away. Are you ready? Well, here's my take on it...and, if I must say so myself...it is a unique viewpoint. One I felt worthy of a redux. Here's my post from last year's Black Friday:

I'm not one to rush out on Black Friday and battle the crowds for a deal. As a matter of fact, I purposefully hole up in my home on that day and avoid the malls. But I certainly don't bemoan the brave (or crazy) souls who choose to embrace the challenge of getting a good deal.

Then there are those who will complain that Christmas is too commercialized and either forsake Americanized traditions or will partake, but moan and groan about it continually. The emergence of sayings such as, "Jesus is the reason for the season," did little more than create more products to buy to advertise that very fact in your home. However, regardless of your spiritual leaning, Jesus IS the reason for the season, and no amount of commercialization can change that.

Yes, I know the day started off as a pagan holiday, but it's been transformed, shall we say, "reborn," and is, without a doubt, a day where Christians around the world celebrate the birth of Emmanuel...the day when God Himself chose to come and dwell with us.

But what about the commercialism? Hasn't that tainted a "holy" holiday?

Not in my opinion. I celebrate the commercialization. Why? For a variety of reasons.

As a Christian, I find it refreshing to hear carols wherever I go, whether I'm in the mall, a doctor's office, a workplace, a flower shop...at what other time of year do you hear the name of Christ proclaimed so unashamedly? I rejoice to hear The First Noel or O Holy Night when I'm grocery shopping or getting my hair cut. I see it as creative evangelism.

Another reason I'm all for the commercialization of Christmas is because, despite the fact that it may bring out the worst in people (particularly on Black Friday), it also brings out the best in them. There is no other time of year when people reach as deeply into their pockets and give. Whether it's giving of a present to a family member or friend, taking cookies to a neighbor, leaving a generous tip for a waiter, slipping a twenty dollar bill into a red kettle or writing a check to a charity, December's giving far exceeds any other month of the year.

Think for a moment what would happen if we eliminated Christmas as a national holiday...if we stopped the commercialization in its tracks. Within the next few years, how many of your favorite retail stores would close their doors? How many non-profits would cease to exist. How many homeless people would die without organizations like the Salvation Army offering shelter and a warm meal? It's rather scary when you think about it.

And what will happen to the Christmas story two or three generations from now? Would it cease to exist as well in the minds of the majority of Americans?

Would Christmas become a quiet holiday shared only by the faithful few who still believed the God who created the Universe would come to earth as a newborn babe? That seems like a far cry from the glory that surrounded that first Christmas as angels sang and announced the birth of a Savior and shepherds rushed to worship Emmanuel. And let's not forget the journey of the Magi -- seeking out their King and bearing gifts.

Singing. Rushing. Giving gifts. Christmas. I celebrate the birth of my Savior. And I celebrate the commercialization of His birthday. When you hear someone saying "Merry Christmas" as they leave a store or restaurant, it just might be me. It may not be politically correct, but let's face it folks...it's what it's all about.

Keeping it real,



  1. Interesting perspective for sure...definitely changes the way I look at it. Instead of being sad by the commercialization of it, I can be grateful for the good that comes out of it. Thanks, Hana. =)

    But, I'm still gonna stay home on Black Fridays!!!


  2. I'm with you on that, Andrea. No shopping for me!!


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